Country

Country
This road leads to home...

Monday, October 4, 2010

The Smokehouse

Recently when I went home I wanted to make sure I photographed this building.   We grew up calling it the "smokehouse."   I can remember hams and other pieces of pork hanging from the inside rafters of it.  That is where my grandparents went to get the "meat." 

According to daddy, they never really "smoked" any meat in this small building.  They butchered the hog (I can remember those days vividly) and then covered the meat heavily in salt and red pepper.   Then, they would let it sit for about 14 days or so and then rinse it off, and cover it again in salt and the red pepper.   Who knew they had red pepper back then??   Also, as my daddy pointed out - no wonder they had such high blood pressures back then! 

I am enthusiastically participating in a new weekly meme at Bluff Area Daily.  Please visit and support this great new weekly photo-op!

xoxo,
SouthernSass

24 comments:

  1. What a great picture...I saw that new challenge. I wish I had more "barns" to photograph other than the one I posted on Sunday. Have a great night!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Ah, now that's a looker, indeed! I love it & the story, too!
    And thank you so much for joining in - this is very exciting for me & I'm grateful to have you on board!!!

    Tricia
    Bluff Area Daily/Old Barns

    It's a Southern Thing... I love that title!

    ReplyDelete
  3. PS I also love your background - Fits perfectly w/ the "Southern" style!
    I think I'm going to add the wood background I have to my blog... Thanks for the reminder!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Beautiful picture. My grandaddy actually smoked the hams in the smoke house. Oh, I remember those smells today.

    ReplyDelete
  5. OH, I am so glad to find your blog...we had a smokehouse and butchered 4 hogs every year and salt cured it. Mom did not add the red pepper though.

    I love this picture...

    ReplyDelete
  6. What a great shot and I love the backstory! So intriguing.

    ReplyDelete
  7. it's a great old building.....
    and that it's in your family
    {{sigh}}
    even better!

    ReplyDelete
  8. i'll take some smoked ham! =) i bet this building does have a lot of stories to tell, indeed!

    ReplyDelete
  9. What a beautifully composed photo; and what a neat building, I love the roof.

    ReplyDelete
  10. A great story of this neat structure. Imagine the amount of meat that was in there over the years!

    ReplyDelete
  11. I love it...Thanks for sharing the history too.

    ReplyDelete
  12. I love the story that goes with the building.
    Great image. MB

    ReplyDelete
  13. Great history with your photo!

    ReplyDelete
  14. Found you over on Glowing Ember- wonderful place you have here- Great photos!

    ReplyDelete
  15. What an interesting building. I can't imagine meat just hanging in a building for a couple of weeks. I think I'd be a vegetarian, lol.

    ReplyDelete
  16. I 'vividly' remember the day I joined my Mother, Grandmother, and various Aunts, when they butchered chickens. I think it may have permanently scarred me....

    Thanks for stopping by my place and leaving such a lovely note! You're welcome any time.

    ReplyDelete
  17. Thanks for the kind comments and for sharing your memories as well. It is so special to have grown up where my daddy, as well as his mother and ancestors. It will forever be home to me.

    So happy to have new visitors and please visit again!

    Rose - Yes, it was salt cured and I forgot to note that. The red pepper surprised me.

    Carolynn - so happy you stopped by! I can also remember my grandparents butchering chickens and I now understand the phrase "running around like a chicken with your head cut off."

    ReplyDelete
  18. totally a smoke house...........let's not think otherwise right??

    thanks for stopping by my blog today-
    xo+blessings,
    Anne Marie

    ReplyDelete
  19. I grew up on farm too! It's funny how certain things stick with you.

    ReplyDelete
  20. Thanks for the back story. When we are driving to visit my parents in NC we often pass old buildings that look similar and I often wonder what how were used. I had no idea that they cured hams that way!

    ReplyDelete
  21. As a lover of old barns I was delighted to find this meme. Since what is called "progress" is causing the old barns in my state to disappear it will be great to see what is still out there in other parts of the country.

    Your entry this week reminds me of the smoke house on the old farm where my mother grew up in central Alabama. The "home place" has been long gone but I treasure the photos and memories of the summers I spent there as a child.

    ReplyDelete
  22. It is very sad to see the old barns and "home places" disappearing. Progress stinks at times!

    ReplyDelete
  23. I love old buildings like this. Especially when there's a story attached. Very nice shot!

    ReplyDelete
  24. It was fun to read the history of this great-looking relic!

    ReplyDelete

Thank you for taking the time to stop by and visit. Your comments are always greatly appreciated!!